What I’ve Learned About Bulking

If you are someone who is serious about lifting weights, or someone who is just starting, at some point you have or will think about trying to get stronger. To a certain degree getting stronger comes with getting bigger. Bigger muscles have a greater capacity to be stronger muscles. This is the reasoning for most lifters choosing to go through a “bulking” phase. Bulking is the simplest terms is a phase of training where total calories consumed are increased and the goals of training are to build muscle and get stronger. Although, bulking can mean many different things depending on who you ask, and the different methods of bulking vary even more drastically. Let me first clarify the notion of a “clean” or “dirty” bulk. A clean bulk is a well paced rate of weight gain, and consists of manageable macronutrients obtained from healthy foods. A dirty bulk is an excuse to eat garbage in the name of bulking. If you are serious about getting better as an athlete by putting on size and gaining strength, you better be eating clean and staying disciplined. Do not make excuses for yourself. For the rest of this article, the term bulking refers to a “clean” bulk.

My first phase of bulking was one, giant, six month long, uncontrolled, experiment. After I stopped wrestling my junior year of highschool, I assumed since I would no longer have to make weight anymore I would gain lots of muscle, and become big and strong. I was mistaken. Instead of eating lots of food and lifting heavy, I was still doing hundreds of burpees, running all the time, and only picking exercises I was good at with my lower body weight. In turn, I gained only THREE pounds over a nine month period (139-142). Just before high school graduation, I decided it was time for me to get BIG and STRONG. I researched and studied many articles, podcasts, and webinars from the top minds in strength and conditioning to figure out just how I would execute this bulking phase. After filtering through all the information, this is what I found to be the most common principle’s of bulking.

  • A healthy rate of weight gain is 1-1.5lbs per week.
  • You must increase overall caloric intake to gain weight.
  • You must lift HEAVY. Your program should reflect a focus on strength. You can’t truly get strong if your program is designed for someone to build conditioning.
  • EAT. EAT. EAT.
  • Keep eating.

All of these pieces of advice are very true, and can create a good base for someone who is trying to bulk. I took all these pieces of advice to the extreme. My goal was to weigh 175lbs and add 90lbs to my back squat in six months. Every morning I woke up excited to weigh myself and see how close I was too my goal. When I ate, I stuffed myself full and then ate more to ensure I was getting enough calories. I stopped all conditioning. Literally ALL conditioning. No running, burpees or rowing for a whole year. I conveniently skipped the light conditioning at the end of the week, because I needed to “recover” when really, I didn’t want to breathe hard. I kept eating and lifting heavy and obtained what I considered at that time to be amazing results. In six months time, I had gone from 142lbs to a bigger and stronger 176lbs. If my rate of weight gain was greater than a pound and a half per week, I didn’t care. I was growing and was blindsided by such a quick and large increase in weight. I had only added about 60lbs to my back squat which at the time I was happy with. This all came at a price. As you can see in the photos below, I went from being very lean, with a traditional light weight, wrestler physique, to what my family members called my dimple belly stage. I was simply too large and soft for my very short frame.

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June 2015. Weight: 142lbs
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December 2015. Weight: 176lbs
  • You must EAT. EAT. EAT. to get big, but you can not just consume whatever portions you want even if it is all relatively healthy foods. For the most part I was eating what most would consider healthy food, but my overall caloric intake was off the charts for what my current activity levels were.
  • Conditioning may not be a focus in a bulking phase, but for the benefit of overall health, some conditioning should be in every bulking program. I was shocked when I had a tough time doing sprint intervals on the rower and running just one mile.
  • There is a reason why most experts suggest no more than 1.5lbs gained per week when bulking. I was just getting too big, too fast and gained a substantial amount of fat and not the amount of muscle I was aiming for.
  • Continue to do bodyweight exercises so you can still move your own bodyweight even at a larger weight. It was one big wake up call when I could barely get through 10 grueling pull ups.

The second time I decided to bulk, it was after I had finished the 2016 Tahoe Show bodybuilding event where I competed as a Teen Men’s Physique competitor. At the show I had my best physique to date. Though I had lost some strength during the prep, I loved how I went from the heaviest I had ever been, and in 15 weeks created my best physique ever.

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2016 Tahoe Show Front Pose. Weight: 149.5lbs
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2016 Tahoe Show Back Pose. Weight: 149.5lbs

Going into this second bulk, I knew I could not repeat the process I had done the year before. I knew I needed to take control of my eating habits, pay more attention to how much weight I was gaining from week to week, and not lose all the conditioning I had developed during the prep for the bodybuilding show. In turn, that meant I needed to change up my programming too. I tested out some new training techniques and programming principles centered around gaining strength (5-3-1, Bulgarian method, etc.). My new goal was in four months to gain between 10-15lbs of body weight, add 30lbs to my back squat, and still have visible abs. The results: Weight Gain: Yes, 15lbs. Back Squat 1 Rep Max PR: No. Visible Abs: Yes. I then realized I needed to learn more about programming for strength. I already learned how to put on weight, and from previous training endeavors understood how to train for conditioning and getting better at bodyweight exercises, but I needed to truly learn how to get strong.

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December 2016. Weight: 165lbs

Gaining weight was the easy part, but what good is more bodyweight if you can’t move heavier weights on the barbell. After this second go around at bulking, here are the new takeaways:

  • It is possible to eat very clean and still gain weight.
  • The training program must be tailored to build strength in addition to muscle size.
  • Getting bigger doesn’t not always mean stronger. I for sure got bigger, but still moved the same weight I always had.

After starting up jiu jitsu again and competing in several tournaments with training goals geared toward building conditioning, maintaining strength and cutting weight for competitions, I knew it was time to bulk again. That is where Settlage Size & Strength was born. I wanted to seriously get BIG and be STRONG. To my surprise, I had made some serious strength gains while still cutting weight for jiu jitsu so I knew the new programming techniques and principles I applied were working. Now it was time to construct the best diet for me that allowed me to have enough fuel to train hard with the weights for two hours in the morning, roll hard in jiu jitsu for two hours in the evening, and still build size and strength. I researched many books, videos, articles, and interviews with some of the best coaches in powerlifting. Guys like Mark Bell, Chad Wesley Smith, Matt Wenning, Mike Israetel and Louie Simmons. After spending hours of studying, and creating draft after draft of the new program, I now had a new way of going about bulking. This time I was very specific in how I tracked my macronutrients, conscious of the program and the progressive overload that I followed as well as splitting the total six month program into two phases. The first three months were focused primarily on hypertrophy or muscle size. The last three month phase were all about strength. Here are the new principles of Settlage Size & Strength for my current hypertrophy phase:

Personal Nutrition:

Macros:

  • Carbs: Start with 2g/lb of bodyweight. Once weight gain stalls for two weeks, increase carbs by .25g/lb of bodyweight. If weight gain becomes greater than 1-1.5lbs per week, cut back carbs by .25g/lb of bodyweight per week till proper rate of weight gain is established. I am currently around 2.15g/lb of bodyweight.
  • Protein: 1-1.5g/lb of bodyweight.
  • Fat: Keep majority of fat sources from healthy fat sources like olive oil, coconut oil, grass fed butter, etc.

Personal Training Protocol:

Big 3 Exercises:

  • Squat every day. Each day being a different squat variation.
  • Drop sets for volume on Monday, Wednesday, & Friday.
  • Bench Monday & Thursday.
  • Deadlift Monday & Wednesday.
  • Accessory & bodybuilding exercises reflect the primary exercise for the day.

Of course there are many more intricacies and details to the program as far as rep schemes go and variations in volume from week to week, but this is the foundation of the program. In the 4 months I have been running this program on myself, I have seen amazing results! In the first 12 weeks I gained 10lbs of muscle, and achieved an unexpected 30lb PR on my back squat! I still have some abs and have kept excessive fat gain at bay. I still am able to do my bodyweight exercises and have plenty of conditioning for jiu jitsu. I must address the jiu jitsu though. The hard rounds of jiu jitsu acts as a great source of cardio that others doing this program might not have access to. I believe jiu jitsu has allowed me to gain weight and consume more calories than if I was not competing in jiu jitsu. Due to my higher levels of activity through jiu jitsu, I can afford to consume more calories. Although, this does come at a price. If I have a hard training session at jiu jitsu, sometimes my workout the following morning can suffer. I do my best to recover as optimally as possible, but sometimes it happens.

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May 2017. Weight 155lbs
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August 2017. Weight: 170lbs

 

All that being said, if you are someone who is looking to gain weight and get stronger, I hope this article gave you some insight and new perspectives on gaining weight and building muscle. The last two years of bulking and cutting cycles have taught me so much. I learned a substantial amount about my body and how it responds to different training stimulus and nutrition protocols, as well as much more. My hope is that you can take these tips I found through my several bulking cycles and apply them to your own! Don’t stop there, join the conversation! If you have questions about bulking or building strength for sport or everyday life, DM me on Instagram (@joshuasettlage) or email me at settlagesac@gmail.com! I am here to help, you. If you are interested in signing up for Settlage SIZE & STRENGTH, now is the time to do so! Registration is open till Sept. 3rd! I have seen some crazy results on this program and I am only 4 months in! Let’s put on SIZE & STRENGTH together!

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Why #SUBMISSIONSTRONG?

#SUMISSIONSTRONG is a training program made for wrestlers, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and submission grappling athletes, made by a former high school wrestler, current BJJ and submission grappling athlete and life long lifter; Me. I have tried many sports, but my one love always came back to grappling focused combat sports. Through the seven plus years of training, I have utilized many different strength and conditioning programs to achieve different goals throughout my grappling career. I constructed this program based off of how I prepared for my last two competitions earlier this year and had great success. My main goals and big focus for this program were to get crazy strong, keep most of my conditioning, and not get too big to the point where I wouldn’t make weight. In this program you can expect to get big, strong, all while still being able to make weight.

WHAT YOU WILL NEED:

To do this program, you will need a weightlifting belt, or a powerlifting belt, and a gym with the equipment necessary to do squats, bench presses, deadlifts, pull ups, dips, and plenty of dumbbells.

HOW DO I KNOW IF I SHOULD DO SUBMISSION STRONG?

Some question for you: Do you lose most of your matches by pin? Do you have a hard time escaping from mount? Do you have a hard time finishing takedowns or maintaining position? If your answer is YES to any of these questions. Then YES this program is for you! Strength is essential to finishing pins, as well as not being pinned. Someone can be a better wrestler than you technically and expose your back for some near fall points, but if you are strong enough to defend and keep moving, chances are you can get back to your belly and stay in the match. Of course we never want to even get in the situation in the first place.

Being a stronger wrestler will allow you to fight harder for advantageous positions and stay on the offensive. Strength in crucial to finishing a takedown. You can have the most amazing takedown technique, but if you are unable to produce the force behind it, forget about it. For you BJJ and submission grappling guys, if you can’t finish a takedown, you can’t engage fight. Even if you’re someone who plays a heavy guard game, you need the strength to hold your opponent in position and control his/her body.

IS THIS PROGRAM JUST FOR BJJ/SUBMISSION GRAPPLING ATHLETES?

No it is not. This is an inclusive strength program designed for ALL grappling athletes. Wrestlers in competing in both collegiate, freestyle, and greco, as well as traditional Brazilian Jiu Jitsu practitioners, and the No-Gi submission grappling crowd. The athletic demands of all these grappling sports are relatively the same despite different techniques and rule sets.

CAN I DO THIS PROGRAM WHILE IN SEASON?

There are going to be two version of #SUBMISSIONSTRONG. One for the off season, and a slightly different one meant for in season training.

I DON’T WANT TO GROW OUT OF MY WEIGHT CLASS. CAN I STILL DO THIS PROGRAM?

Of course you can! Through proper nutrition and training, you can still get crazy strong without having to grow out of your weight class. Although, this program is best used for someone who is already small for their weight class and is looking to get stronger for that weight class.

CAN I USE THIS PROGRAM TO CUT WEIGHT?

You can, but it wouldn’t help you cut weight at all. If you are looking for a program that is for a weight cut and /or conditioning, peep #SUBMISSIONSHREDDED.

WILL I LOSE THE CONDITIONING I

GAINED FROM #SUBMISSIONSHREDDED?

If you follow the workout program, stick to the nutrition guide, and recover well, you shouldn’t lose any conditioning. That goes to say you might not necessarily PR your mile time, but are you trying to run fast or get strong to win matches?

WHAT IF I’M A BEGINNER AND HAVE NEVER LIFTED BEFORE?

This program can be easily tailored to your experience level as a lifter. If you are someone who is just getting into sport specific strength and conditioning, you can choose the scaled version of the workouts.

#SUBMISSIONSTRONG PRICING:

#SUBMISISONSTRONG
Program Payment Plan Price Description
#SUBMISISONSTRONG One Time

$260 (Best Value)

Full access to all 12 weeks of #SUBMISSIONSTRONG, private Facebook group, live Q&A’s, weekly check-ins and monthly FaceTime calls.
#SUBMISISONSTRONG Month-to-Month

$95

Full access to all 12 weeks of #SUBMISSIONSTRONG, private Facebook group, live Q&A’s, weekly check-ins and monthly FaceTime calls.
#SUBMISISONSTRONG (Personalized Programming) One Time

$300

Full access to all 12 weeks of #SUBMISSIONSTRONG tailored specifically to your athletic needs and resources, and bodytype, customized nutrition plan, private Facebook group, live Q&A’s, daily check-ins and weekly FaceTime calls.

If you’re interested in getting #SUBMISSIONSTRONG, fill out the fields below to sign up for the newsletter!

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